Doctor’s Tips on How to Make Halloween Healthier for You and Your Children

I enjoy Halloween, more for my kid to dress up than it is to eat candy. Actually, I don’t really eat candy, unless you count chocolate as candy. My lack of enjoyment for candy stems from my childhood – my parents never let me eat anything I obtained from trick-or-treating. When I was young, I thought them to be paranoid from watching one too many 20/20 and Nightline specials. Now that I’m adult and a parent, I call it “cautiously aware”.

My mother’s words, “There could be a needle or poison in the candy!” echo in my head as I teach my child the enjoyment of of trick-or-treat is like “catch and release” when sport fishing. Oh, and there are also the dangers of damaging your teeth, weight gain, and bad habits that form from candy-hoarding.

Dr. Mayrene Hernandez of UnitedHealthcare (www.uhc.com) has a few ideas so health-conscious parents can avoid ruining one of the most kid-friendly celebrations of the year:

Instead of candy, opt for healthier or non-food alternatives

Candy is fun, but healthy food can be as well. Making small oranges, popcorn balls or fruit cups with pumpkin faces drawn on them can encourage healthier eating while still getting into the Halloween spirit. Give trick-or-treaters dried fruit, fruit leathers, crackers or trail mix.

Trick or Toys?

Or, if you want to avoid giving out candy or snack foods altogether, give small toys, stickers, temporary tattoos, pencils, Halloween erasers or glow-sticks. Kids receive plenty of candy on Halloween and will enjoy being surprised with the “extras” they gather while trick-or-treating

Get out and exercise

Candy consumption certainly increases on and around Halloween, but so does walking. Fitbit recently analyzed its data and found the average user walked an additional 2,750 steps on Halloween. While those extra steps won’t cancel out all those candy bars you ate, the added walking and exercise can help you control your weight and improve your health.

Take family walks around the neighborhood before Halloween to plan your trick-or-treating route. The additional movement can benefit the whole family.

Fill your little goblins’ tummies with healthy food before they hit their candy stash

Eating a healthy dinner before trick-or-treating will help ensure your kids are properly fueled and less tempted to snack their way around the neighborhood. Plus, for safety you should save your candy until you get home to screen for anything potentially hazardous.

Candy-Donation programs

If you return home and your family has more candy than they should eat, search online for a local dentist or other business participating in candy-donation or buy-back programs. Call first for each location’s program details.

This Halloween, have fun dressing up and eating a few treats, but balance the usual indulgence with making healthier choices.

About Dr. Mayrene Hernandez

Dr. Mayrene Hernandez joined UnitedHealth Group in 2012 as part of the South East Clinical Services Leadership Team. She originally started as an inpatient care management medical director. She was promptly promoted to her current role as the Sr. Market Medical Director in Florida. Her role is diverse with direct and indirect engagements with multiple sectors within a manage care organization.

She is Board Certified in Family Practice for well over 10 years also a practicing physician.  She holds the position of Clinical Assistant professor at Nova Southeastern University and enjoys being a mentor to future medical students.


Disclaimer: This post is for informational purposes only. No monetary compensation was made for this post. Information provided by UnitedHealth Group.