Parenting Books List

Now that I’m a parent of a newborn again, I feel the need to revisit books that helped me with my first child, as well as try new books. I attended a wonderful and helpful (now defunct) mom’s meetup group years ago, which was kind of like a book club. In that group, books were outlined and discussed, some of which are on this list. Needless to say, I’ve forgotten a lot in the six years since then, but at least it’s less daunting this time around!

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Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

This book is new to me, and I really liked it. It’s a quick read, based on statistics and written by an economist. Although it’s driven by data, Emily Oster also shares her own experiences which stray from the norm. Cribsheet is a great reference book and also helps with any anxious feelings about parenting. I highly recommend it!

Shine: A Mom’s Guide to Help Her Daughter Find and Follow Her Dreams

I received this book to review from the publisher, coincidentally enough around the time I was due to give birth to my second daughter. I stuck it in my overnight bag, thinking I would have time to read it in the hospital, but that didn’t happen. I finally got to it a couple weeks later, but finished it very quickly (over the span of a few milk-pumping sessions). This book is a guide that is easily referenced and is suggested to use in combination with the author’s website, https://www.neishahernandez.com/. The website contains resources to help implement the “roadmap” guide for setting goals and following dreams, outlined in the book. The author, Neisha Hernandez, talks about how she implements this into her dance school and provides examples of it’s success. I think it’s a great tool for moms because it helps you achieve goals by breaking them into manageable sized pieces.

Taming the Spirited Child: Strategies for Parenting Challenging Children Without Breaking Their Spirits

This book was recommended to me by a physician friend of mine while I was having a very difficult time with my first daughter. I definitely needed it because it provided me with information and tools to understand my child’s personality. Some things it suggests are using positive adjectives when talking to and about your child (whether they are in your presence or not). “Spirited” is definitely a word I’ve adopted, and this book has helped tremendously. There is another book in the same vein called Raising Your Spirited Child.

The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind

This (and the two books below) are from the mom’s meetup group I mentioned earlier. The WholeBrain Child is definitely a book I need to revisit. I see a personality difference in my child since she turned six, and this book helps you learn how the brain is wired and what expect at certain ages.

Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs

I remember this was a book I didn’t read, but the mom’s meetup group covered it in several sessions. Rebecca, the group leader, gave us handouts and we discussed the topics. I definitely need to read this one.

NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children

This was another book that was covered in the mom’s group meetup. Like the previous two books on this list, it delves into the way the mind works, and how a lot of the “old way” of parenting is no longer applicable. I think it was while we reviewed this book, but one thing that stood out was how parents shouldn’t randomly use the phrase “good job” without a very specific thing addressed on what is complimented. In addition, it’s the effort, rather than the result which should be exalted.


Disclaimer: This post is intended for informational purposes. It contains affiliate links. All opinions are honest and 100% my own.